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Sadler's Wells Theatre

Sadler’s Wells is embedded in the heart of Islington, near Angel, and is currently the sixth theatre to be on the site since 1683. It has two theatres: Sadler’s Wells Theatre and the Lilian Baylis Studio, both owned by the Sadler’s Wells Trust, which works with charitable trusts and foundations to present their year-round programme. Sadler’s Wells is acknowledged as being one of the world’s pinnacle dance venues. The theatre acts as a stage for visiting companies, as well as producing its own work with a number of closely associated artists and companies. In recent years...

Salisbury Playhouse

Salisbury Playhouse is one of Britain’s leading producing theatres and a registered arts & educational charity. It has a national reputation for home-grown work of the highest quality that attracts audiences from across Wiltshire, Hampshire, Dorset and beyond. It is part of Arts Council England's National Portfolio of Organisations (NPO) and also receives regular funding from Wiltshire Council and Salisbury City Council. The building comprises the 517-seat Main House and the 149-seat Salberg, along with a purpose-built Rehearsal Room and Community Room. There is also an on-site...

Savoy Theatre

The Savoy Theatre is a West End theatre on the historic Strand, in Westminster. The theatre first opened its doors in 1881 on the site of what was the Savoy Palace, a grand house for noblemen of medieval London. This venue is embedded into the history of the city’s theatre and is also a Grade II listed building. The Savoy Theatre was the first non-domestic building in the world to be lit entirely by electricity, and was met with widespread acclaim on its opening. The building was designed by the famous theatre architect C. J. Phipps, who created the large auditorium that...

Shaftesbury Theatre

The Shaftesbury Theatre completed West End’s Shaftesbury Avenue, being the last venue to be built on this famous stretch of theatres. Originally named The Prince’s Theatre, it opened in 1911 and has hosted many notable productions over the last century as a well-known London theatre. In 1973, part of the theatre’s roof collapsed and there were calls for the site to be redeveloped. Through a campaign it was saved, and also attained a Grade II status to protect the original building and ensure the ground wasn’t repurposed in the future. This was a crucial moment in the theatre’s...